Clothing company forced to remove ‘Gluten Free’ T-shirt after 53,000 angry

The Western world has obviously been at peace for far too long and has prospered far too much, because these days we have so little to actually worry about, apparently, that too many of us sit around and wait to be “offended.”

In past tumultuous times, when Europeans and Americans were fighting for their very lives, trivial things were just that – trivial – and what’s more, we could all tell the difference. If something did bother us, we were mature enough to realize that a) there is no global requirement that says every person, everywhere, has a right to never be offended; and b) at some point in time something we all say or do is likely to offendsomeone else, because that’s just the way life works. Or rather, that used to be the way life worked.

As you read this story, try to imagine someone in some bombed-out Syrian hellhole caring much about it.

As reported by the UK’s Daily Mail, clothing retailer Zara pulled a T-shirt emblazoned with a “gluten-free” slogan from shelves after whiny customers complained that it was insensitive, among other things (when in reality, that’s not at all what the company was going for).

Thousands “offended”

The white graphic T-shirt read simply, “ARE YOU GLUTEN FREE?” no doubt as a way of heightening awareness of how gluten can be hard on some people’s digestive systems. But this basic message was too much for some shoppers, who became enraged and lost their minds, accusing the Spanish fashion brand of trivializing celiac disease.

Marta Casadesus, from Terrassa, Spain, was so ticked off that she launched a petition drive to have the T-shirt removed. She was joined by some 53,000 other whiners, and Zara has since apologized – for some reason.

Casadesus posted her campaign on Change.org and wrote that she was passing a Zara store when she noticed a mannequin posing with a crop top featuring the message. She claimed that the slogan “caused me indignation” because to her the message was not “appropriate.”

“Coeliac disease is not a fad, nor is it a disease to take it in jest, because of the strictness of the diet that must be followed, gluten-free, and the problems it can cause if it is not done properly,” Casesus complained, as translated and reported by the Daily Mail.

“The message of this shirt trivialises an important health problem, which affects morepeople and should be considered whenever the intolerant person – gluten, in this case – is eating out, for example.

“For this reason it does not seem right that these messages fill the streets, as they have a role contrary to what the awareness and education in this sense intended,” she whined on.

“They can be quite influential and therefore its role could be more educational than is today. I started this petition to ask Zara to apologize to the Spanish coeliac group and commit to not trivialise this disease.”

Taking the wrong things too seriously

Others who saw the petition and agreed with its premise also missed the point.

Lauren Shaw posted on Twitter that she couldn’t believe the design. She complained: “It is not a trend, it’s a serious diet.”

Someone with the Twitter handle @Murelimoos tweeted: “Why joke about an actual food intolerance?”

And Raul Orruno posted: “They no longer respect anything. Anything goes in order to generate profits.”

To believe that Zara, which aims its designs at younger people, would purposely design an article of clothing to anger that very demographic is beyond absurd, but then critical thinking seems to have been decimated among today’s younger generation. There was a time when people would have appreciated the fact that a major clothing maker was attempting to draw attention to a condition that its designers – who, truth be told, are probably around the same age as “the offended” – are very in tune with.

Western civilization needs something serious to contend with in a bad way, something that will force us to get over ourselves and stop taking the wrong things so seriously.